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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Probably a stupid question:

I have a 2002 Tundra 4.7 V8 4x4 limited slip.
My manual says in the front 75w90 (easy enough).
In the rear it says a couple of different ones: 80w or 80w90 or 90w.

It's hard to find any 80w90 especially ones rated for limited slip. Should I use a different weight in the rear like 85w140 (which is available)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Should I use amsoil and buy the right weight (as manual says) online?
I can't find Royal Purple or Valvoline (that's rated for LSD) in any stores around.

I see that amsoil has that weight online.
 

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Amsoil, RP, M1, Valv, will all work well. If one makes some noise, add a lsd additive (Slip-Lock is Amsoil's brand).

My 2002 non-LSD diff is specced for 75W-90 per the manual. I'm not sure what you would use the 140 weight fluids for... desert areas maybe??
oh yea? :mellow3d:

Dunno when the spec changed in Toyota's manual. I thought the rears were the same. I was just regurgitating info from this thread (as I usually do, and you do too :p).
http://www.tundrasolutions.com/foru...n/125266-diy-differential-oil-drain-and-fill/
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So even if it calls for 80w90 in the rear 75w90 would be OK for LSD?
75w90 is a lot easier to find that's why I was wondering.

I've never changed the gear oil before so I didn't know for sure.
Just want tom make sure.
 

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Amsoil, RP, M1, Valv, will all work well. If one makes some noise, add a lsd additive (Slip-Lock is Amsoil's brand).



oh yea? :mellow3d:

Dunno when the spec changed in Toyota's manual. I thought the rears were the same. I was just regurgitating info from this thread (as I usually do, and you do too :p).
http://www.tundrasolutions.com/foru...n/125266-diy-differential-oil-drain-and-fill/
Yeah, the above is for the 2005. As per my manual (and my Chilton), the 2000-2002 rear differentials require a 90 weight oil, either a 80W-90 or SAE90. The 4WD front diff is specced for 75W-90, but it is also the weight I run in my rear open diff as well. :tu:
 

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Same here, I run Amsoil Severe Gear 75w90 in Front & Rear Diffs, and Transfer case.

Tundrasooner, oil weight is something everyone should get to know better. This has been covered a handful of times on Tundrasolutions, but one more time never hurt anyone. Also, for a more lengthy lesson in motor oils, we recommend looking at bobistheoilguy.com as a resource. The #'s before the w in 80w-90 is referring to the cold viscosity of the oil. The #'s after the w are referring to the normal operating temp viscosity. From experience, I bet you can tell me how long it takes your truck to warm up to normal operating temps (mine is about 6-8 minutes of driving to work). That time is probably different in the gears since they aren't warmed at the same rate as the engine, but you get the point. The 75w is so close to the 80w that you and your gears will probably never notice a difference. So in closing, the #'s following the w are the important ones here. If your manual says SAE 90, that means use a XXw-90 weight oil. You will rarely find a 90 weight gear oil outside the range of 75w-90 to 80w-90. :tu:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Same here, I run Amsoil Severe Gear 75w90 in Front & Rear Diffs, and Transfer case.

Tundrasooner, oil weight is something everyone should get to know better. This has been covered a handful of times on Tundrasolutions, but one more time never hurt anyone. Also, for a more lengthy lesson in motor oils, we recommend looking at bobistheoilguy.com as a resource. The #'s before the w in 80w-90 is referring to the cold viscosity of the oil. The #'s after the w are referring to the normal operating temp viscosity. From experience, I bet you can tell me how long it takes your truck to warm up to normal operating temps (mine is about 6-8 minutes of driving to work). That time is probably different in the gears since they aren't warmed at the same rate as the engine, but you get the point. The 75w is so close to the 80w that you and your gears will probably never notice a difference. So in closing, the #'s following the w are the important ones here. If your manual says SAE 90, that means use a XXw-90 weight oil. You will rarely find a 90 weight gear oil outside the range of 75w-90 to 80w-90. :tu:
Awesome.
Thanks for the info. I knew what some of the difference in regular motor oil was (example: 10w30 vs 5w30 which is what is called for, 5w30 does a little more for cold) but I didn't know if it was that big of a deal in the front and rear ends.
Again thanks for the info.
 
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