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I know that the correct answer about towing above weight rating is "not safe" but from experience there is a margin that can be used with caution.


We are looking at moving across a significant portion of the country. the wife is uneasy about driving long distances, and hard no on towing our current 8x20 enclosed trailer any distance. She had an impact with it just moving it in our driveway, she wont drive a U-haul either. My wife is a smart book worm but clumsy and not at all aware of how physics works, I don't want to push her beyond her comfort zone. Witch makes for a conundrum I need to do it all in one vehicle I drive, all my eggs in one basket so to speak.


Our current 20’ is old and on its last legs and not big enough, considering moving up to a 24’ or 28’


I used to punish my poor 96 6cyl LandCruiser with the 8x20, one run was 13K GCVW, well over the cruisers rating, it was slow going uphill but it made it there eventually, electric brakes were a necessity, the trailer had to help stop to have a reasonable stopping distance, and I had installed bags to help out the coil springs.


I recently bought her a used 2016 Sequoia with 200k miles, rated for 7k pounds towed, it has a lot more power than my cruiser, and seams to have more weight on the ground how much trailer can it really tow? I would imagine there is one answer for eastern flatland and another for western mountain passes. Passes are problematic both ways, pulling up and slowing on the way down.


I know the coil rear will be an issue with tongue weight, I can probably balance it well enough by carefully balancing the load, I will need to install my brake controller. I am hoping not to have to put bags in this time.

So what is the max you have towed with a second gen 5.7l Sequoia that felt OK?
 

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I know its a bit older but I regularly tow about a 7100lb boat w/double axel trailer with my 2008 Sequoia and frankly barely feel it back there. I've never had any sway. I did invest in a hitch/ball that was properly weight rated and adjustable up and down. And before anyone asks I'm not using a Weight Distribution Hitch. The boat trailer won't allow it because it has a foldable tongue. I did put two air bags inside the rear coil springs just to help. The only issue I ever had was I was towing the boat and had just picked up about 300# of lead weight. I put the lead weight in the back of the Sequoia and was could definitely tell I had too much weight going on back there as we were bouncing around a bit too much. I pulled over and moved the weights to behind the passenger and drivers seat and everything was fine thereafter. The 5.7l is a beast.
 

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I would look into adding a WDH, loading up the truck and trailer with all your gear then heading to a Cat scale near you. You really need to understand where the weight is and what changes you can do to improve the current scenario to keep it within the vehicle's rated ability. .
 

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Honestly, It is all about the hitch. I tow a 31' Airstream camper. It tows beautifully with a Hensley Hitch. I weighed in on a CAT scale and am guessing the trailer is just south of 8,000lbs. Power is not an issue if you downshift manually and leave it in 5th gear.
 

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The 08s thru 10s had a published max tow rating up to 10,000 Lbs. Toyota was the first Manufacture to go all in on the SAE J2807 Tow Rating Procedures in 2011. The Detroit 3 did not adopt the rating procedure until 2014-15. In 2008 the 10K Rating was limited to a specific Model Code 2WD 5.7L Tow Package. ie.. 4:30 Gears, Transmission & Oil Cooler. Max Rating for any 4WD was 9600 Lbs w/ 5.7 & Towing Package and a specific Model Code,. There are multiple model codes and ratings. See Attach Pic of 08 Manual. My understanding is nothing was changed mechanically. Just the rating method. You can take that for what its worth. Many will use a vehicle beyond its published rating.

My father was a Semi Driver. Based on what I learned from him over the years, if you were to have an incident while towing one of the first things they will do is evaluate and likely weigh your set up to see if you were within limits. A lawyer would use that info against you in a case if you were over the published limits. You would have to be willing to accept the risk.

Just food for thought.

I wish you safe travels!!

Tow.JPG
 

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Typically you should have a vehicle that is at least overrated by 25% of the weight you'll be towing. Meaning, if you have a vehicle rated to tow 10,000 pounds I wouldn't exceed 7,500, but that's just me and my experience. My experience was I had a Ford F150 with a 302 V8 rated to tow 7,500 pounds, I had a trailer that weighed 6,000 pounds loaded, that truck struggled at towing that trailer, even slight hills required me to floor it which dropped it a gear; bigger hills, not mountain grades just hills, the truck would slow down till it downshifted, and then continue to slow down till it downshifted again then it would maintain. My newer Toyota Tacoma with the 5.7 tows the same trailer and I don't even know it's behind me!

Personally, I don't like marginal vehicles, I want a vehicle that will tow my trailer without stressing the engine, the cooling system, or the brakes.
 
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