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I've seen a few people saying they've changed their oil at 500 or 1000 miles. I know the benefits, but would it be all that bad if i waited till 2000 or 3000? I'm at about 500 miles now. Thanks
 

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mjsca said:
I've seen a few people saying they've changed their oil at 500 or 1000 miles. I know the benefits, but would it be all that bad if i waited till 2000 or 3000? I'm at about 500 miles now. Thanks
You'll be fine. The benifit to changing it early is minimal at best. Most people who change their oil early change to synthetic for the peace of mind of knowing they have the best protection in their engine from the get go. That's why I changed it early. If they put synthetic in it from the factory I wouldn't have touched it until 3000 or 4000 miles.
 

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Oil Change

Go by the owner's manual. :eek:
 

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mjsca said:
I've seen a few people saying they've changed their oil at 500 or 1000 miles. I know the benefits, but would it be all that bad if i waited till 2000 or 3000? I'm at about 500 miles now. Thanks
You can change at anytime. The advantage of waiting is to have the engine breakin using less expensive dino oil. Early changes contain metal particles from the assmbly, manufacturing and breakin processes.
 

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When you do change your oil, or even before, do yourself a favor and add some Militec. It is wonderful stuff. I run it in everything I own. I just put a new topend on my CRF250X and it looked factory fresh!

I think their website is www.militec-1.com :tu:
 

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A word to the wise. I would wait to change to synthetic until after the break in period. By going to synthetic to early you are not allowing the rings to seat properly.
 

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I agree

Ground Up said:
A word to the wise. I would wait to change to synthetic until after the break in period. By going to synthetic to early you are not allowing the rings to seat properly.
Happened to me once. Changed to synthetic too soon & engine started using oil. Had to change back to dyno oil for a few thousand, then went to Mobil 1. Got 225,000 miles out of the engine and it was still running strong when I sold it :)
 

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This practice of not breaking in an engine with synthetic is just a myth. New vehicals can be broken in with synthetic. Synthetic is installed at the factory in Aston Martin's, Porsche's, Vipers's, Corvettes, Mercedes, GTO's, Mitsu EVO's, Bentley's and more. If it's good enough for those cars it's good enough to go in my truck from day one.
 

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tbrown78 said:
This practice of not breaking in an engine with synthetic is just a myth. New vehicals can be broken in with synthetic. Synthetic is installed at the factory in Aston Martin's, Porsche's, Vipers's, Corvettes, Mercedes, GTO's, Mitsu EVO's, Bentley's and more. If it's good enough for those cars it's good enough to go in my truck from day one.
My buddy bought a 2000 Tundra when they first came out. He claimed it
came from the factory with synthetic engine oil. Do they still do this?
 

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bennicde said:
My buddy bought a 2000 Tundra when they first came out. He claimed it
came from the factory with synthetic engine oil. Do they still do this?
Never did - still doesn't
 

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tbrown78 said:
This practice of not breaking in an engine with synthetic is just a myth. New vehicals can be broken in with synthetic. Synthetic is installed at the factory in Aston Martin's, Porsche's, Vipers's, Corvettes, Mercedes, GTO's, Mitsu EVO's, Bentley's and more. If it's good enough for those cars it's good enough to go in my truck from day one.

Nope, it's not a myth. A lot of it has to do with the factory break-in process (if any) of an engine, and how the rings are designed. I have the problem of rings not seating in well on a couple of high performance engines, including one 1994 Corvette ZR-1.
 

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mattmarshall said:
Nope, it's not a myth. A lot of it has to do with the factory break-in process (if any) of an engine, and how the rings are designed. I have the problem of rings not seating in well on a couple of high performance engines, including one 1994 Corvette ZR-1.
I don't know anything about this, but don't you think all those manufacturers that SPEC syn from the factory would know a thing or two on the issue?

This is not to doubt your claims of poor ring seating. Only that maybe some engines are built for syn specifically.
 

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mattmarshall said:
Nope, it's not a myth. A lot of it has to do with the factory break-in process (if any) of an engine, and how the rings are designed. I have the problem of rings not seating in well on a couple of high performance engines, including one 1994 Corvette ZR-1.

It's a myth.. check the link below. If it's not a myth then Mobil is putting it's company name on the line.

http://www.mobil1.com/USA-English/MotorOil/Synthetics/Myths.aspx
 

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Thought this was interesting.


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Using synthetic-oil in engine break-ins
By Road & Track, Technical Correspondence Column, July 2000 issue


Many readers have questioned us on engine break-in procedures when using synthetic oil. Conventional wisdom has it that a new or freshly rebuilt engine should be broken in using mineral oil, then, once enough mileage has accumulated to ensure rings and cylinder walls have lapped themselves into harmony, synthetic oil can be used.

Readers have correctly pointed out that several major brands come from the factory with synthetic oil, among these being Corvette, Mercedes-Benz and Viper. How can these engines break-in if run on synthetic oil from day one, they ask?

To find out, we spoke with Mobil and Redline Oil companies for their take on the synthetic break-in question. Mobil's response was that engines break-in just fine on synthetics, and that any wear point in the engine significant enough to be an interference, and thus susceptible to rapid wear, would be a wear point no matter what lubricant is used.

Redline, on the other hand, has found it best to recommend a mineral oil break-in. Occasionally an engine will glaze its cylinder walls when initially run on Redline, they say, so by using a mineral oil for 2000 miles, verifying there is no oil consumption and then switching to the synthetic, glazing is eliminated.

Cylinder-wall glazing is not a deposit left on the cylinder wall, but rather a displacement of cylinder-wall metal. This happens when the high spots of the cylinder wall crosshatch are not cut or worn off by the piston rings, but rather rolled over into the valleys or grooves of the crosshatch. This leaves a surface that oil adheres to poorly, against which the rings cannot seal well. Compression is lost and oil consumed, and the only cure is to tear down the engine to physically restore the cylinder-wall finish by honing.

Why is glazing not a problem for the major manufacturer? Because they have complete, accurate control over their cylinder-wall finish and ring type. Redline deals with a huge variety of engines and manufacturers, both OEM and from the aftermarket. Cylinder-wall finish and ring type thus vary greatly, and glazing can therefore occur, albeit rarely.

While we were at it, we queried about synthetic oil-change intervals. Mobil says to use the maximum change interval specified by the engine manufacturer, regardless of oil type. Redline said that once past an OEM warranty, anywhere from 10,000 to 18,000 miles, or one year, whichever comes first, is appropriate depending on conditions (dust, short trips). They also recommend changing just the oil filter at 6000 to 7000 miles as a precaution against overloading the filter. Redline further noted a caution when using synthetics with leaded fuels, as synthetics do not hold lead in suspension as well as mineral oil. Aviation is one area where leaded fuel is still widespread, and avgas is often used by off-road and racing enthusiasts, so a relatively short oil change interval may thus be indicated.


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Synthetic Break-in
By Tom Wilson
Road & Track, Technical Correspondence Column, November 2001 issue


Exxon/Mobil's official policy is that their synthetic oil may be used at any mileage, including factory fill, unless otherwise stated by the vehicle manufacturer. Mobil pointed out, as you did, that all Corvettes, Vipers, Porsches and Aston Martins are factory filled with Mobil 1 synthetic. We can only conclude that improvements in cylinder-wall finish and ring design or materials makes this possible.

It is also likely that vehicle manufacturers not using synthetics as the factory fill are also not optimizing their cylinder and ring packages for the slippery sythetics, in which case approximately 1000 miles on mineral oil should prove ample break-in time. In fact, in modern engines a very high percentage of ring break-in takes place very quickly, probably in the first 10 to 20 minutes of engine running. Certainly, some final lapping of the rings and cylinders takes place over several hundred miles after initial break-in.

Just to add some confusion, Porsche dynos all of its engines before installing them in the chassis. We were unable to determine what oil is used for the dyno session, but would presume it's Mobil 1
 

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I had my 05 Tacoma's first oil change, yesterday, and asked my service manager about the whole synthetic vs dino debate.

He said, from his experience, he recommends having your first 4 oil changes with dino (whether you do it at 3,000 or 5,000 miles....I'm a 3,000 changer) On the 5th, go ahead and switch to synthetic, if you want.

For the record, my dealer uses Valvoline motor oil but has Mobile One Synth for those who want it. (For extra $$, of course.)

Boo
 

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the majority of automotive companies do a break in at the factory before the engine goes in.

They run it through the whole rev range and and gears. Breaking in a modern engine is many times not as necessary as most would make it out to be. There is still some break in to be done by the consumer but its minimal and I personally believe is complete by the time you hit 50-100 miles depending on conditions let alone 1000miles.

The baby the engine during break in is to cover them incase something is defective, it will happen latter instead of sooner.
 
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