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Supportive Supporter
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Discussion Starter #1
Man......! I am getting a bit tired of the ruff azz roads that I live on.....it is no longer fun. I live on un-maintained mountian dirt roads....often covered in snow, then mud then just hard pack dirt. I've lived up here for 18 years and I'm kinda used to it.....
But, ther are days when I'm in a hurry and it feels like I'm thrashing my truck.
Is there a soft riding, maybe long travel (not nesessary) suspension kit that is available? I have the Billy 5100's front & rear.....the fronts are only cranked up to the 2dn notch.....Toyo Open Country A/T's 265/75R16 8 Ply tires on stock wheels. I've even set the tire pressures down into the 30's and it still rides rough. I don't hate the truck....It will still go anywhere I point it......I'd just like a smoother / softer ride.

Suggestions? (besides move outta the dirt, quit your bitching, walk etc.? :argue:)

Thanks
 

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Icon seems to be pretty smooth, a friend of mine has their coilovers on a double cab and they are as smooth or smoother than my Toytecs. Throw on a set of uniball upper a arms and you should be cool. There is only so much you can do to smooth the ride on terrain like that. I have heard really good things about Team West Camburg coilovers, they are just re-valved Camburgs. It's really a catch 22.
 

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Wow sounds like fun to go to your house, but I can understand it getting old at times.
Depending on how bad your road is, how fast you want to run it, and how much you want to spend, for the front you can go ICON shocks (or FOX, SwayAway) with Uniball upper control arms (this combo makes a world of difference). For the rear, Deaver springs with either ICON,Fox, or SwayAway for shocks or see how you like your 5100s with the new springs.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Or the other obvious one....go back to completely TRD stock suspension.
The suspension is stock.....TRD OR package (it came with Billys)....One of the stock billys lost a lower bushing a while back, so I replaced all for with new 5100's....front ones being the adjustable spring pre-load type. So it's really not that far from stock.
 

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The Tire Guy
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I recently went to the 5" tuff country lift with total chaos uca and uniball, I have saw coilovers with the lift. Before the lift I had the saw's cranked to 2 1/2"s of lift and it wasn't that great of a ride. When I put the tuff country we cranked the saws down to stock height and it is night and day. Don't get me wrong it's no luxury sedan ride, but my teeth don't rattle with every bump and pot hole. It's a good bit of coin but so is a long travel. I'm also running 10 ply dest mt's, which don't help on the ride either. If you don't haul or tow try a 6ply or p rated tire and keep your psi in the low 30's. I just dropped mine from 45psi to 35psi and that made it even better. Maybe put some weight in the rear, it might help with hopping.

Oh yeah, one more thing.....you do drive a truck!!!:boink:
 

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Those 8 ply tires you said you have just sort of jumped right out at me; those are really heavy, stiff tires. Do you really need eight ply for hauling - they will carry more than your Tundra can handle, or are you just using them because they are so many plies, for puncture resistance? Most off road tires are two or three ply sidewalls, with two belts, most commonly, radials, and they are quite durable. You would find them to make a vast difference in the ride of your truck.

I used to use Michelin radials on my work trucks, two ply sidewalls with four steel belts, load range E, and the only time I had problems losing air in a catastrophic fashion was if I was having to break trail and ran over a greasewood or other such denizen of the western deserts and mountains the wrong way and a stick punched a sidewall; never had a tread puncture, and the two ply sidewalls were even quite rock resistant, even when aired down. And, those tires rode as well as passenger tires on roads, rough or paved. My last big truck was a Chevy Dually 4 x 4, and it came equipped with very aggressive, heavy off road tires - I think they were probably eight plies; the thing rode like it had no flexible suspension at all. The suspension was really quite flexible and compliant, though, and after I changed the tires to the Michelins, it rode like a nice truck rather than a belligerent wagon.

For the "fat tires" on my play truck, an '83 Toy pickup, I used 12.00 x 33 x 15 Bridgestone Dueler radials. I have Yokohama Geolandar ATs on my Tundra, inflated to normal 30 psi, and they ride well, and handle off road stuff just fine.

Just something to think on from a forty year veteran of desert and mountain heavy construction trades.
 

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if you have the toyo 8 ply side wall tires,id change those first,go down to an average 2 ply.i have 3ply side walls on my truck,and it made a huge diffrence compared to stock tires "bouncey",as far as suspension goes,icon coil overs and UCAs,will improve your ride alot,just dont crank the coil overs way up,just put the truck level,that will give you over 12" of travel,you wont even know your on a rough road.good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have been thinking that the tires might be part of the ruff ride....but I can't change them yet.....they only have 20K miles on them....and I'm cheap! Plus they really work well in the snow and mud.....that part of them is great.
A question for you Camburg UCA or other Uniball guys......do you have any wear problems with these units?
 

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PSI to 30 or 25 will help greatly but be to little on road depending on how fast you go.

Really whats bouncing is the rearend cause it has nothing in the bed right? I corrected this issue on my T100 as it rode horrible in the rear. I added an extra long leaf and had the packs reworked and it made the truck ride like a caddy.
 

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i have icon UCAs,and so far no problems at all,i have tons of travel,and a great ride.
 

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My brother's truck has Icon's w/ Camburg UCA's and is alot smoother over rough stuff then my 5100's. It takes it better. A Deaver leaf pack in the rear will make a huge difference. I had these on for a couple of month and had to sell them because I load alot of fire would in my truck, but I wish I could have them again the ride was night and day. Sooooooo smooth coupled with the 5100's, I could'nt imagine them with a set of Icon 2.5 external resi's!!! If you have about $2500 to spend I would go with Icon's, Camburg UCA's, Deaver leaf pack, 5100's in the rear or Sway or Icon 2.5. Be a perfect mid-travel Tundra!
 

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If his roads are rough/rutted going stock would bounce him allover the place slow or fast wouldn't it?

Hmmm, not in my experience. If I didn't want clearance, I would have stuck with stock. In all my endeavors (spacer, adjustable 5100's, and finally 2.5 C/O's), I found that the stock TRD rode the nicest on moderately rough roads (not crazy rough, my Icons do the best on that!). They are soft enough to really just soak up all the little chatter, as long as your not hauling major tail and fading the shocks out. After rereading the OP, I see that he wants to haul butt, so I guess your best bet is aftermarket C/O with uniball UCA. Thats the only way you'll really be satisfied~!!!
 

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First, make sure that the pressure in your tires is really the pressure they need. Do the chalk and heat tests. I have never, ever run my tires (successfully) above about 30psi...higher, and they wear the center. Get the tire pressure set correctly first, and keep in mind that unless the truck is loaded, you need less pressure in the rear because it's so light. Try 2-3psi less in the rear tires with an empty truck, so maybe 30/28 front to rear, or so. Verify this with chalk and heat (actually pressure) testing.

Second, ply rating is not the same as the number of plies, and I agree 100% that you do not need E-rated tires unless you're towing/hauling, and not necessarily even then. Try C or D.

Third, the stock springs are softest. Get a shock with softer valving than you have now, or switch to the digressive valving of the Icon coilovers, and a lot of the chatter will disappear. Most of what you're feeling is stiff valving and tires, not stiff springs. If you switch to a stiffer valved coilover with a stiffer spring rate, what you're feeling now will only get worse.

-Sean
 

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Camburg upper control arms (a must) keep em lubed, Camburg Coil Overs (keep em clean), Billy 5100's and Deaver racing springs from wheelers. Also i got toyo open country ATs in a 275 and they are soooo quite, my truck is soo smooth. Stock **** is like a pogo stick.... although if you opt for the wheelers racing springs they dont carry big loads too good, but i usually carry my wood and other heavy **** with a trailer anyways. Also, dont lift your truck more than a 1/2-1 b/c your not reallty lifting it your just cranking down the prelaod on the spring, which is going to contribute to a harder ride. All together should run you around 2 gs but seriosly, washboard eating machine yo! :first:

You wont regret it, whole new truck!


**edit** Never go with a bolt on sub frame lift like a 'tough country' such a piece of poorly engineered crap and a insult to the fine piece of engineering that is your 1st gen tundra. Any time is see some one with a massive lift i just laugh, i got a stock lift and ive never had a problem filling up my 4 remaining seats with skinny white girls. :)

-mack
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Cool.......thanks for all the inputs!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
A Deaver leaf pack in the rear will make a huge difference. I had these on for a couple of month and had to sell them because I load alot of fire would in my truck, but I wish I could have them again the ride was night and day. Sooooooo smooth coupled with the 5100's Be a perfect mid-travel Tundra!
Are the ones you're writting about the Deaver Part #F85 listed on this page:
Deaver Suspension

Not too exspensive....might be just what I need!
 

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i think derek24 might have been referring to what is called a deaver "10 pack" set of springs. the 10 pack replaces all of your factory leaf springs and they are around $600.00. i am not sure how the deaver part #F85 rides in relation to the 10 pack and if it adds to your ride height. the 10 pack is definitely a softer set of springs than your factory leafs and the 10 pack raises your ride height about 1 to 1 1/2" if i am not mistaken.
 

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I love the idea of a better ride, but I tow a snowmobile trailer in the winter and occasionally haul construction stuff in the bed.
 
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