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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2000 Tundra with 106,000 miles. It sees fairly mundane use as a wet weather vehicle to get back and forth to work , but is not a work truck. I do occasionally ( 2 or 3 times a year ) use it to pull a 16' trailer with up to 5,000 pounds for yard work , typical homeowner type stuff , etc. So , Why have I had to replace the bank one , sensor one O2 sensor five times now? And the bank 2 , sensor one is now in need to be replaced for the second time?
I am running a K&N air filter in the original air box , ( Mostly for economical reasons ) and the rest of the engine is stock. The spark plugs have been changed approximately every 30,000 miles. I get the coolant flushed about every three years. The Mobil 1 engine oil gets changed just once a year. My average miles/year is 10,000. Is there something I'm doing , or not doing that might be causing the frequent failures of the sensors? :noidea:
 

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What sensors are you using? I would replace all 4 at once. Use only Denso 02 sensors.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey Mike. 2 of the 5 ( Bank one , sensor 1) were Bosch. the other three were OEM. The first replacement of the Bank 2 sensor 1 was also OEM. So far , it doesn't seem as though the Bosch is any better or worse than OEM.
 

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2015 Toyota Tundra DC SR5 5.7L
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Hey Mike. 2 of the 5 ( Bank one , sensor 1) were Bosch. the other three were OEM. The first replacement of the Bank 2 sensor 1 was also OEM. So far , it doesn't seem as though the Bosch is any better or worse than OEM.
A couple of questions:

1. What CEL codes are you getting? Are they always the same?
2. Are you adding any fuel additives, fuel injector cleaners, etc to your fuel?
3. What Denso units are you using? (They're in a 234-XXXX code structure)

* * * IMPORTANT * * *
Don't use Bosch components in any ignition or emissions-related system. Denso (and NGK/NTK to a limited extent) is the only one that is specced to work with the Toyota ECU.
 

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A couple of questions:

1. What CEL codes are you getting? Are they always the same?
2. Are you adding any fuel additives, fuel injector cleaners, etc to your fuel?
3. What Denso units are you using? (They're in a 234-XXXX code structure)

* * * IMPORTANT * * *
Don't use Bosch components in any ignition or emissions-related system. Denso (and NGK/NTK to a limited extent) is the only one that is specced to work with the Toyota ECU.
I agree lets dig deeper in this. I have not heard of many tundras eating that many 02's. Always change all on that bank and use denso.
 

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Just throwing something in. If they are primarily the front ones, it could be an issue related to the TSB on the fronts. I distinctly remember the tech at my dealer stating that they not only replaced the sensors, but also "reflashed" something in the ECM. This may be irrelevant, or total BS, but may be worth looking at. I'll try to dig and find the TSB.
 

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After looking, the only thing I can find in the actual TSB is that they installed "improved" sensors, so I guess the dude was just BSing me. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hey Remmy - The code I got two weeks ago was p0135 and is the most frequent code I get , though I have had a failure of one of the other sensors just once. I bought a Bosch o2 sensor and installed it. The C.E.L shut off for about two weeks. ( Please spare me the beating , I didn't know about the Bosch being a poor choice at that time) I have used Bosch before and that one lasted at least a year ; in that same location - Bank one sensor one.
Now , however , the C.E.L is on again and I'm being told by Advance Auto parts that not only is that Bosch sensor failing but another sensor is failing - OEM bank 2 sensor 1. I don't recall the trouble code for that one. I threw away the print out that AAP gave me.
I am not using any fuel additives or octane boosters. I have used injector cleaners probably three times in the whole life of this truck.
 

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Hey Remmy - The code I got two weeks ago was p0135 and is the most frequent code I get , though I have had a failure of one of the other sensors just once. I bought a Bosch o2 sensor and installed it. The C.E.L shut off for about two weeks. ( Please spare me the beating , I didn't know about the Bosch being a poor choice at that time) I have used Bosch before and that one lasted at least a year ; in that same location - Bank one sensor one.
Now , however , the C.E.L is on again and I'm being told by Advance Auto parts that not only is that Bosch sensor failing but another sensor is failing - OEM bank 2 sensor 1. I don't recall the trouble code for that one. I threw away the print out that AAP gave me.
I am not using any fuel additives or octane boosters. I have used injector cleaners probably three times in the whole life of this truck.
OK. The P0135 is the heater circuit failing in the sensor. It is a common failure point in any heated oxygen sensor unit -- at 90,000-100,000 miles.

Now, the main issue is why you are having these things go out on you over such narrow time intervals. Since you have replaced the Bosch with OEM Denso units and roughly the same failure interval was observed, it leads me to believe that it isn't the units themselves but the connector/harness that's the culprit.

Therefore, I suggest closely inspecting the condition of the connector assembly, paying particular attention to corrosion, galling, green crusting, etc. in the electrode seats. If you find any thing like this, then you might be able to clean the connector, pack with dielectric grease and make it work; however, I would guess that a replacement of the harness might be required.

Q: Has the truck ever been in high-salinity/sea water, i.e. driving on the beach and getting water splashed up into the engine compartment?

Take a look at the connector and harness and report back what you find. (You'll probably need a good, bright, compact flashlight like a tactical light to get up there and see properly.)

Good luck.
 
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