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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2007 Toyota Tundra SR5 DBL Cab TRD. Im Towing a Outdoors RV Timber Ridge Travel Trailer with a max capacity of 8000lbs. I was curious to see what my actual weights of the fully loaded truck and trailer combined with a 500lb ATV in the box of the truck.
Here were my findings at the scales.

Front Axel 2976lbs
Rear Axel 4608lbs
Trailer 3010lbs

The GVWR of the truck is 7100lbs and My findings say that my actual is 7584lbs. 500lbs over the trucks GVWR. Goodbye ATV.
BUT I am within the GCWR. Trucks rating is 15500lbs and my actual is 14218lbs. 1282lbs under the truck GCWR. yay.


I was using a weight distrubution hitch. Is there any other ideas on how to transfer the wieight across the truck to the front axel.
 

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Your numbers don't add up. I think you have the wrong weight written for your trailer. From your GCW it looks like your trailer axle is about 6600lbs.

Assuming your tongue weight is 10% of the trailer weight, that's 650lbs. Add the 500lb ATV and that's 1150lbs. However your numbers show over 1600lbs more on the rear axle than the front. Doesn't look like your WDH is doing much for you if anything at all.

Also keep in mind each axle has a limit of 1880 kg (4136lbs).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes my trailer axels were 6635lbs (3010kg). I took the trailer off and measured the tongue weight 904lbs (410kg). Does that make sence?
I also wighed The truck and ATV seperatly and found that front axel gained 419lbs.

Truck and ATV
Front - 3395lbs
Rear - 3284lbs

I want to make this work if I can. I have air bags and had them at 45psi.
 

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To be honest, I don't know enough about WDH's to answer your question. 900lbs on your ball will definitely take some weight off your front axle. There's good videos on youtube on how to properly set up a WDH. You should see your front end come down and the rear rise when the WDH is hooked up.

In terms of being legal, there's nothing you can do except get rid of some weight. Whether or not you're safe is a topic of many threads on this forum. Air bags, load range E tires and a WDH hitch definitely help. Anti Sway bar wouldn't hurt either.

However I'm not much of a towing expert, maybe someone else will chime in with some sage advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the input. I feel the same way about being legal and safe... I just ordered a Reece dual cam weight dist hitch 12000lb rating .. got to keep the family safe..
 

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You need to tighten the bars, this will move the weight to the front axle, the seesaw effect is moving weight from the front to the rear axle. Measure the front and back bumper heights before you hitch up, then again after you tighten the bars. The spread should stay the same, in other words the back should not sag in relation to the front.
 

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john 2012 066.jpg
Just curious is there anyone who would travel with the extra 500 lbs over the GVWR?
Oh I'm sure it happens every day even in BC. I always hear in Alberta you would never get away with that in BC but when i'm on the Island i see more over loaded POS on the road then any wheres on the prairies. Just check out the picture that's Not a half ton crewcab truck. john 2012 066.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Haha.. Are you advertising? Atleast someone is still driving it... Dont want my truck to look like that one.. But I sure hope my truck lasts like it... Such a grey area cause i know the truck can handle it.
I'll show my wife the truck... she'll laugh..
 

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my concern was your suspension in this effort. The 2007 isn't too beefy. Then, i saw you had airbags... so you should be good. I put airbags on mine and towing has gotten way better. Another thing that helps for big loads, BEEFY tires. Go H rated, like the BFG AT/ko. They have structural steel in the walls, or some such tire science. Great tires will help everything.
 

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View attachment 46196

Oh I'm sure it happens every day even in BC. I always hear in Alberta you would never get away with that in BC but when i'm on the Island i see more over loaded on the POS road then any wheres on the prairies. Just check out the picture that's not a half ton crewcab truck. View attachment 46196
Victoria special according to the phone #....I was gonna guess Tofino....lol :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
my concern was your suspension in this effort. The 2007 isn't too beefy. Then, i saw you had airbags... so you should be good. I put airbags on mine and towing has gotten way better. Another thing that helps for big loads, BEEFY tires. Go H rated, like the BFG AT/ko. They have structural steel in the walls, or some such tire science. Great tires will help everything.
I've got the BFG Allterain.. They are E rated brand new... They should be good enough... But that onboard compressor sounds like a good idea.. that way im not packing around a compressor... Are they easy to mount??
 

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Ok, your numbers all make sense. From what I can tell, your weight distribution hitch is not set up properly. Actually, you might as well take it off because it is doing nothing at all. What you are seeing is a classic teeter totter effect. When you put 905 lbs of weight that far behind the rear axle, it unloads the front axle by 419 lbs and loads the rear axle by 1,324 lbs. The net weight change on the truck is 905 lbs (1,324 - 419). You can fix this by adjusting your weight distribution hitch. A good setup for a Tundra is to have the front axle weight stay the same, the rear axle weight will be about + 800 lbs and the trailer axle will get about 105 lbs. So, let's make these assumptions and rerun your data (with the ATV):

Front axle: 3,395 lbs
Rear axle: 4,084 lbs
Trailer axles : 6,740 lbs

You are within the axle rating which I feel are critical do not exceed weights. You are still over on GVWR by 400 lbs (~5%). If you have LT rated tires, I think you should be fine. Be careful though. Adding more things to the truck or trailer will just make you more overweight.

Tom
 

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yeah, decently easy. When i bought the airbags, I also bought the heavy duty compressor and wireless keyfob. Installed the whole thing myself with a few buddies. If you'd like to see how and where I mounted my compressor and controllel, drop me a line and I will send you some pics - IamCorrect at gmail.com
 

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Baze, I noticed in a later post that you mentioned you put 45 psi in the airbags. That is likely contributing to the ineffectiveness of your WDH. Setting up a WDH with airbags can be tricky. You should set up the WDH without any air in the bags and without the ATV in the bed. Take measurements of the wheel well height before hooking up the trailer. Measure from the rim somewhere, not the ground because the tire will squish or sink a bit. Write those measurements down. Now hook up the trailer and engage the WDH. Adjust the tension in the WDH until the front wheel well height matches the measurement before you hooked up the trailer. This indicates your front axle is now loaded the same before and after the trailer is hooked up. Now you are happy.

Now, to adjust the airbags. With the trailer hooked up, WDH engaged and ATV NOT in the truck, measure the rear wheel well height. Load the ATV and put just enough air in the bags to return the rear wheel well height to the pre-ATV (but trailer hooked up) height. DO NOT ADD ANY MORE AIR. This will raise the rear of the truck and that will unload the WDH. That is bad.

In summary, use the WDH to distribute hitch weight across all axles (that's why it's call a weight distribution hitch). Use the airbags to counter additional payload in the bed of the truck (that's why airbags work well for 5er's).

Also, if you need pics of a wireless compressor install, go here:

http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/towing/156280-wireless-compressor-installed/

Happy towing.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
TOM, Thanks for setting me on the right track, I'll set it up later this week. The RV dealership did not set it up that way you described. The WDH I'm using is a 750lb EAZ-LIFT. Which is probably part of the WDH problem. I have orded the 1200lb Strait line sway control WDH. I did have a bit of sway with the trailer WITHOUT the ATV in the back. I'm hoping that will make a difference.

Do the measurements have to be done on absolute level ground?
I'm trying to convince that the compressor is a must need to make life easier...
 

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Measurements do not need to be on level ground. You are just measuring how much the body squats on the suspension. Although a 5% grade might skew things a bit.

My 2005 Tundra did not have the remote. My 2008 does. Well worth the expense for me as I use it a lot more (like the other day when I just stopped by and got 1,600 lbs of mulch). And I can adjusts it while driving to see what works best for that day's load. BUt it is not necessary.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Alright, nothing but good news. After making the adjustments that Tom sugested and by applying the 1200lb wdh, the truck is properly adjusted fully loaded.
The Front axel is taking more weight and I am under the Trucks GVWR. It was nice to see... Hopefully it stays that way.
Cheers.
Baze
 
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