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Bank 1 = driver's side
Bank 2 = passenger side
Sensor 1 = front (aka the "fuel-air", or "upstream" sensor; located in the exhaust manifold)
Sensor 2 = rear (aka the "oxygen", "emissions catalyst function" or "downstream" sensor; located behind the catalytic converter(s)
I got a P1074 code which says it's a Sensor 1 Bank 2.

Where exactly is that? When standing infront of the vehicle and looking down at the engine, where should I look?

Also, can someone tell me which of the following I will need?

Bosch Spark Plugs: Automotive spark plugs, Motorcycle sparkplugs, high performance plugs

or

Bosch Spark Plugs: Automotive spark plugs, Motorcycle sparkplugs, high performance plugs

I failed emissions today, horribly. HC ppm reading was 910 (150 is the limit) and CO% was 6.86 (0.70 is the limit). I've changed the oil before the test and after the test I cleaned the MAF sensor (which was pretty dirty). I'm hoping maybe the dirty MAF sensor was the culprit but I'll change the 02 Sensor just in case.

Can someone help please? I have 1-1/2 weeks before my sticker expires. :(

Thanks.

Edit, I've attached a photo:

 

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Anyone have clue what size the hex nuts are for the rear O2 sensor on the 2002 Tundra? My check engine light came on a while ago and have been driving around with a failed inspection sticker since January. I never checked until now...weather don't ya know...under the truck to see the sensor. Both nuts were gone. The rattling I've been hearing was the cowling that goes over the sensor...it was just sitting there. The new sensor I have won't allow the cowling to sit over it so wondering if just getting the hex nuts and tightening the old O2 sensor will do the trick. Every hex nut I've tried here at the house has different threads...must be a metric thing. Thanks.
 

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Its 7/8 Just buy deep(like 4") 7/8 socket, cut the wires off the bad sensor or even some of the skinny part by the wires and remove it. Use OEM DENSO because people were/are having problems with Bosch O2 sensors
 

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Its 7/8 Just buy deep(like 4") 7/8 socket, cut the wires off the bad sensor or even some of the skinny part by the wires and remove it. Use OEM DENSO because people were/are having problems with Bosch O2 sensors
He's talking about the rear (downstream) sensors which are mounted using two 12mm, 6-point locknuts. Get them from your dealer.
 

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I replaced both front O2 sensors on my 2001 Tundra last week & it went smoothly. All I can say is make sure to spray them with PB blaster or WD-40 & let it do it's thing. Hardest part was getting the leverage to loosen the old sensors & also needed a 10" + 6" socket extension to reach the driver's side sensor. The electrical connector actually was easy for me & just manipulated my fingers to work them off. Just follow the advise here & the nice tutorial Remmy700p put together & it should be fairly painless.
 

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Awesome thread, guys! My check engine light lit up a couple days ago. The beloved Scan Gauge II said I had a P0031. After researching and landing on this thread, I headed off to get my parts. My parts guy @ Fred Haas Toyota World said their were two parts, one with a blue tag and one without. He said to check and see which one I had. Of course, that meant getting dirty and I was not ready for that yet. LOL

I asked him if he could sell me both parts and if I could bring back the wrong one. He said no problem, except he only had the one in stock. I was on my way by the store, so I whipped in and bought the one he had. Next, I went to O'Reilly Auto Parts to borrow their slotted socket. I picked up some dielectric grease while I was there. When I had my headers installed a long time ago, the CEL came on with the same code and the installer just put some of that grease in the connection and it worked fine. I figured an ounce of prevention....

So, off to the driveway. After moving my wife's Sequoia out so I could use it for parts runs if needed, I pulled mine up, got out the tools, squirted the requisite WD40 and then went to the back yard to do some hedge trimming of our hibiscus plants that froze last winter while the WD40 did its thing.

After coming back, I decided that I needed to remove my Skid Row skid plates to get better access, so the front and middle ones came off. I then learned that my part didn't have the blue tag. Ooops. The one they parts guy sold me did. By this time it was after 5:00 p.m. and he said he could not even order it until Monday, which meant arrival Tuesday. Then he said pull it off and check the part number.

Fortunately, I had no trouble getting it off after breaking the sensor loose with the short stubby socket. After wrangling a bit until I figured out how to release the connection, I switched sockets to the tall one, and twisted it right off. After inspection, my part number was the exact same one I had picked up earlier. WHEW! I guess the blue tag has come off after 156,000 miles.

I stuck some grease on the connector, cleaned the female threads on the headers, and screwed it in hand tight. I reached for the tall socket and finished the tightening and torquing. All was good. Then I had to figure out how it connected back. This was almost the most tedious part. LOL

After getting that resolved, I fired it up, cleared the code with my Scan Gauge II, and turned it back off. Fired it up again, and no CEL. Wheeeeee!

After gathering up the hibiscus branches I had pruned and cleaning up the tools, I took it for a longer test drive to get the branches to the dump and take the tools back to O'Reillys. No CEL.

The OEM part cost $123 at the dealer. Parts and labor would have been at least 3X-4X that had I had the dealer fix it. With the exception of the soak time, the whole thing probably took me only 1.5 hours. Of that, almost an hour was screwing with my abused skid plates. In fact, the last dudes that put them on after replacing my steering gear rack had FUBAR'd the threaded nut inside the frame and replaced it with another, not welded to the frame. Oh my gosh, that was a pain to get that bolt back together with that nut.

Thanks for all the help, guys. GREAT THREAD. Once again, Tundrasolutions saves the day (and lots of $$$).


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Advance Auto Parts stores also will read your code for free in PA. My 01 Sequoia shows a P0135 bank 1 sensor 1. AAP then sold me a Bosch O2 sensor for replacement for $115. Is Bosch OK? Did I get took?
 

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my mechanic put a bosch in 10000 miles ago and it appears to have held up although i just had another sensor go. not sure if its the same one or not so this will be the test as to whether its the bosch thats the problem or something else.
 

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my mechanic put a bosch in 10000 miles ago and it appears to have held up although i just had another sensor go. not sure if its the same one or not so this will be the test as to whether its the bosch thats the problem or something else.
Folks,

DO NOT USE BOSCH COMPONENTS ON ANY TOYOTA ECU-RELATED SYSTEM!


BOSCH COMPONENTS ARE DESIGNED FOR EUROPEAN AUTOMOBILES AND ARE NOT VOLTAGE-COMPATIBLE WITH TOYOTA'S ECU.

That includes oxygen sensors, spark plugs, MAF units, etc. Stick with Denso and/or NGK/NTK.
 

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Folks,

DO NOT USE BOSCH COMPONENTS ON ANY TOYOTA ECU-RELATED SYSTEM!


BOSCH COMPONENTS ARE DESIGNED FOR EUROPEAN AUTOMOBILES AND ARE NOT VOLTAGE-COMPATIBLE WITH TOYOTA'S ECU.

That includes oxygen sensors, spark plugs, MAF units, etc. Stick with Denso and/or NGK/NTK.

X's 1,000,000

I replaced my O2's with Bosch and man did I have headaches. They threw codes after a couple hundred miles and only after talking to Remmy was I able to get it resolved with DENSO.

Remmy is the O2 go to guy on this forum.
 

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Just finished changing both front sensors on 2002 4x4 Tundra. I found the best way to unclip the drivers side was to lay perpindicular to the frame of the truck, head towatds drivers side, feet toward passenger side, left hand reaches in in front of the cross member and grabs the wires. Use your right hand and reach in behind the cross member, through your line of sight and unclip by pulling up on the tab, pull apart with your left hand. This should only take 1 try and cost you 5 minutes.
 

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I received an 0138 code so since I will be replacing bank 1, sensor 2 on my '01 I thought I might go ahead and replace both. Well, as others have found out, of the four nuts, after extensive soaking with WD-40, I was only able to remove one with a socket. The other three are so rusted that there isn't much left of them so I am planning on having to break them off. Once I get these done I may very well replace the front ones too. Thanks for the advice on avoiding Bosch sensors as that is the brand that the local Napa carries.
 

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Warning... For those of you who's Tundras have a few more miles than the break-in period (mine's pushing 180,000), there may be another issue causing the same O2 sensor codes to pop up on the CEL. I had both codes from the rear sensors coming on. Occasionally, I could clear them and just one would return. I fixed them both, just like before except a bit more practiced at it this time, and still got the darn codes. I noticed that the engine was a bit more noisy over the last few weeks, and discovered a pin-hole leak on the exhaust headers. The headers eventually separated at the Y-Pipe flange and boy, was it loud then! Knowing the my break-in period was almost over (170,000 miles or so by then) I ordered a new set from JBA. When they were installed, no more CEL codes. So, for the older trucks, if your exhaust manifolds or headers are leaking in front of the O2 sensor, it will cause the O2 sensor to appear bad, and send a CEL code.

There is one more place to blow your money on these same codes, too. The mass air flow (MAF) sensor in the intake pipe between the air cleaner and the plenum is also a good mask of O2 sensors. It seems that the computer tries to match the intake air flow with the adjusted amount of exhaust gasses to determine performance. My MAF was dirty (and just cleanable) and I got the O2 sensor codes for that, too. Cleaning the MAF was a solution for that one. O'Reilly's sells the MAF sensor cleaner.

I hope this saves somebody else some money.
 

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I replaced the Bank 1 Sensor 1 on my '01 Sequoia w/4wd last evening. Using the 7/8" oxygen sensor socket that I purchased from Napa I was able to put a 15/16" wrench on the top and had enough room to loosen the sensor. Prior to that I tried to use extensions on a socket wrench and could not gain clearance around all the drivetrain and steering components.
 

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Has anyone had to change the rear O2 sensors? I just did my front ones and figured I'd do the rears while I'm thinking about it but the mounts are pretty rusted and I'm not even sure what type of nut is on the stud.
 

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Just bought all four sensors from Rock Auto for $121.64. Truck has 153k miles, so hopefully I don't have to do this again for another 8 years. Also, Christian Brothers (Frisco, TX) said they would install these for $170 if I bought the parts.
 
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