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Thanks Guys, great info.. Check engine light Code P0135 Bank 1 Sensor 1 at almost 98000 miles, 2000 Tundra. At 24000 miles check engine light P0130 Bank 2 Sensor 1 was replaced under warranty. The Dealer got me this time Part and labor 286.96.. Its been too damn cold so I choose not to replace it.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Now if only the moderator would make this a sticky so I wouldn't have to search for it next time. Hint, hint!

Pinnacle, thanks for the great pictures!!!

Just found the great index of articles in the DIY section. My compliments to whoever did that.
 

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AeroKroil is the best out there. I had one can stop spraying before it was empty. I removed the nozzle, pushed the white plastic piece down, then squeezed the metal nipple from each side until it cracked. I them used channel locks to peel back the metal. Then I removed the hose from inside the can. The can felt relatively empty, but I poured almost half a pint into a mason jar. BTW, Kano has a google special going on right now. Two cans for $12.00 shipped. Great price!
 

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I performed this on my 03 4.7L last January. The instruction was spot on.
Fortunately, it was my passenger side sensor that went bad. I had bought 2 thinking I would just replace the driver's side sensor as well, but no dice. It was seized. I could only get it out about a half a turn before it just would not budge. Tried more PB Blaster and waited overnight, but still nothing. I could barely get it back in the half turn. I slightly frayed the wires in the process so I took some liquid electrical tape and put several coats on them. Once that was dry I started it up and cleared the code. No codes since. :D

The OEM Denso sensors cost me about 1/3 of local retail by buying online. Even if you include the cost of the scan tool and O2 socket kit from Amazon, I still saved myself about $150 and it provided some time with my son who now really appreciates the Toyota engineering lesson.

Thanks for detailing the instructions.
 

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Man that was tough - maddening considering it is so simple but yet almost unreachable. I changed out the sensor and took off and put back on the negative connector but yet my CIL is still lit. I am hoping it is temporary. I have a second sensor to put on bank 2 if needed but really don't feel up to it for a while - bank 1 wore me out. Tomorrow I will go back to Advance Auto Parts to get another reading...
 

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P0051 here too. Followed the advice above and changed everything out in about 30 minutes. Bought the O2 sensor removal kit listed above, purchased the O2 sensor, a tube of anti seize (even though there was already some on the new O2 sensor), a can of PB Blaster and a bottle of Sea Foam for ~$150. Dealer wanted $353+ and I'm stoked to follow the steps above and have such an easy DIY. I saved $200, got some new tools and got to work on the SUV.

BTW, these instructions work great for a 2001 Limited Sequoia!
 

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I have had a CEL P0135 for about 8 months. I have had the parts for about 7 months. To busy to fix it. FINALLY got my garage together and my tools out from behind boxes, found a few hours of time and this forurm and TAHDAH! With the preplan reading and a few pictures from this thread, I had it done in about an hour. The driver's side took about 2 minutes to undo the cable. I had reached under and soaked it with PB last nght so the sensor came out easily. Total maybe 15 minutes. THEN I got to work on the passenger side. After dorking with the connector with a screwdriver, I remembered someone saying it was easier if you could work it with your fingers. I got my thumber on the little lever dealie. squeazed it with my index finger and somehow managed to get my other had in far enough to tug on the cable. It took about 4 attempts to get just the right combination of forces, but it unclipped. This sensor didn't come out as easy, so I started up the truck for a few seconds as recommended, gave it another push and it came right out. Totaly maybe 20 minutes. Spend about 10 minutes on either end putting the truck up on stands. Acutally wound up only using one on the passenger side and there was plenty of room. (I am not a small framed man either!)

I saved on the parts, the time and the dealer labor because of this forum and the multiple threads about this job. Plus I got the satisfaction of doing it myself AND my 8yo son was actually interested in what all I was doing over playing our Wii! That last part by itself made it all worth while. He actually said he wanted to build a go cart! YEAH BABY! :amen:

Thanks to all who have contributed to all the O2 Sensor Replacement threads!

T
 

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Hello,
I managed to do both front O2 sensors this morning in about 1 1/2 hsr. Thanks to all the suggestions on this post. Made this simple. I have a 03 tundra 4wd 8 cylinder. 146,200 miles. All service by my dealer. every 3500 miles. Never missed one. Decided to try myself and save 400 bucks. Sensors were just over $200. Got Bosch ones. Auto Zone will let you borrow 3 piece o2 sensor set for a deposit which you get back on return. 25 Bucks which i got back when i returned them. I used penetrating oil for 2 days, bout 4 times a day before i started. Warmed engine bout 2 mins before starting task. both sensors came out as easy as spark plugs. Penetrate, penetrate, penetrate. I think this is key. Thanks to all for making what I thought would be a nightmare, more like childs play.

Dave P
Quakertown, PA
 

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Thanks for this DIY saved me tons of time getting it out. Bought PB Blaster, Socket (amazon) and denso senor all for $140 with a coupon to adv auto.

* Sprayed pb blaster on the sensor.
* waited an while
* Loosened socket a quarter turn, sprayed more pb blaster.
* waited about 30 min
* Sensor came out of the socket easily.
* Spent 30 minutes getting the electrical connector out. (i'm about 6'9" and have huge hands, which made this very difficult.)
* put some anti-seize on the new sensor
* cleared the code by disconnecting the negative on the battery.
* CEL free for now. (I hope it continues.)
 

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I could be way off on this since I am just guessing by looking at the pics posted by pinnacle but I think there is an easier way to get the connector apart.
You should be able to remove the female end from the bracket it is secured to. You can see in the second last pic it is just above and to the right of the female connector. There is a lock tab on either side of this. Push one side in to release, then the other side. Now the the connector is not secured, getting to the lock should be a lot easier and you might be able to get in there with 2 hands. I did it this way when removing one of my tail lamps. Again, this is just a guess from looking at the pics. I cant see what kind kind of room is there but it definitely looks more workable than trying to unlock the connector first. I know those can be a real pain.
 

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You should be able to remove the female end from the bracket it is secured to. You can see in the second last pic it is just above and to the right of the female connector.
This crossed my mind a few times, but since nobody else had mentioned it in this thread I thought it would be best to NOT get creative. I was worried I'd break something or not be able to re-connect it.
 

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I build Corolla's so I see these types of connectors all the time and often have to remove them. I know they are easy to do. Like I said, maybe getting off to the side in this location is more difficult. Too lazy right now to crawl under my own ride and see exactly where that is.

Edit: OK, I got off my lazy ass and had a peek. 05 is different than pics of the 03 but similar idea. I say it still might be easier to pop connector off bracket then unlock male/female. Wondering too why guys buy those open sided sockets. Wouldnt it be smarter to just undo the connector first then remove 02 sensor with open ended wrench? I know many are rusted to hell but actual torque is not that high. I think around 48nm if memory serves correct. Either way, once the connector is undone, no need to worry about twisting the wire. Am I missing something else here?
Drivers side by the way looks like a real PITA. Maybe not a knuckle buster but I easily picture myself slitting my wrist wide open trying to work around the heatshield. Guess I'll worry about that when they need changing.
 

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Thanks Mike-buh and pinnacle for your posts in 2009. And thanks for the great pictures pinnacle! As others have said, these posts made all the difference.
I just did Bank 2 Sensor 1 (passenger side, ahead of the catalytic converter) on my 2003 Tundra 4.7L 4WD with 94,000 miles. Maybe I can contribute something. The P0051 code means that the resistance of the heater circuit is lower than normal. The repair manual for the 2003 Tundra 4.7L says the resistance should be 11 - 16 ohms at 68 degrees F. This is tested between the two terminals at the top of the sensor's connector when held with the tab on top (the tab that the retaining clip on the female socket holds on to). My old sensor had an open circuit. The new Denso sensor read 15 ohms. Not a big deal, but the P0051 code can be caused by other wiring or PCM/ECM issues. The test can confirm you've got a bad sensor. It's easy to test once the sensor is out.
I used the feet-under-bumper position as suggested earlier and started pressing on the raised part of the connector where I guess the clip is. I was surprised when the sensor's plug dropped out. Because it's hard to see in there, I'm not sure how it worked. But it did.
I put penetrating oil on the sensor about a week ago. Put some more on last night. This morning, I used the Lisle 12100 Oxygen Sensor Socket (from Amazon - 10 bucks) and a 3/8 ratchet without an extension. It broke loose like a 90K mile spark plug does. Then I turned it out the rest of the way with my fingers (lucky?).
 

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I could be way off base or missing something. Has anybody checked the price on Denso sensors on Amazon? I am talking exact fit plug. Is it a too good to be true thing? They seem to be half price of even Rock Auto.
 

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I could be way off base or missing something. Has anybody checked the price on Denso sensors on Amazon? I am talking exact fit plug. Is it a too good to be true thing? They seem to be half price of even Rock Auto.
Yep. Typically, Amazon is the best pricing for the Denso sensors.
 

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Thanks to everyone that posted about how to fix an P0051 error code for the front passenger side oxygen sensor. Thanks to everyone else, my experience went very well today. I would like to add the following.

First, as others have said in this post and others, getting a special socket for this job is a must. I found one at Harbor Freight dirt cheap but ended up going with this OEM 27110 set on Amazon instead for $17.24. I did not know if I would need more than just the socket but I wanted to be prepared for anything. As it turns out, I only used the socket.

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Also, I bought an Equus 3030 engine code reader for $59.99. This was optional since in most states Advanced Auto will read your code for free but I figured with all the money I was saving by not having this problem fixed at the dealership, I could splurge and buy another tool. I love tools. Before I started the project, I used this to confirm that I only had one bad sensor. It had been awhile since I had Advanced Auto read my code so I wondered if a second one had gone bad. So far, only the front passenger side ox sensor has gone bad. From what I read on the Internet, most of these low priced engine code readers have the same features. I picked this one because the display was bigger than the alternatives.
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Lastly, I bought the new oxygen sensor. I called the dealership and they wanted around $157 if I remember correctly. Next, I checked Rock Auto. I found an exact replacement Denso (OEM not universal fit) for $62.01 after my discount including shipping. I discovered on Coupon codes and discounts for 30,000 online stores! RetailMeNot.com, a promo code that I used for an additional discount in order to get the price that low.

Finally, it was time to actually get under the truck. After 94,000 miles and numerous Michigan winters on my '03, I was expecting a long day. Thankfully, I was wrong. I tried to take plenty of pictures as I went to help out the next person to read this thread. Here's an overview of the sensor. I found it was often easiest to get to it with my body parallel to the body of the truck with my feet under the front bumper.
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Below is a closeup of the threaded portion of the sensor. Most of my time was spent removing this. The rust had seized it up. Unfortunately, I had not sprayed it with Liquid Wrench prior to today. You will need some exensions for your ratchet in order to get at it. I did not have a really long extension so I combined two 6" extensions. It was not budging so I encouraged it a little with a cheater bar. I tried to be patient because I had read on the Internet about people stripping the threads. Eventually, it broke loose.
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Here's the threaded portion after removal.
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As many other people have noted, getting the plug end removed can be a real pain. First, I tried the screwdriver method to try to unclip it. This was going very badly. I was concerned that I was going to break the part that remains on the truck for the next sensor. Then, I reread this thread again. I tried to use my middle finger to reach up on the top side of the plug, release the catch, and then use my remaining fingers on the same hand to remove the plug. It is only possible to get one hand up there at a time. In order to do this, I had to work blindly with my feet under the front bumper. Amazingly, despite my big hands, this worked very easily. Here's a closeup of the plug end of the sensor.
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And here it is again after the plug was removed.
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Installing the new one was easy. The Denso replacement came packaged with some anti-seize. There was plenty left over for future projects too. Here's the finished install.
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Lastly, I used my new engine code reader to erase the error. I put the truck back down on the ground, started it up, and for the first time in months there was no engine light on.

Thanks again everyone for making this project go so well.

Thank you so much for posting this information and pictures. I followed it step by step and was able to change both of my front O2 sensors. Saved me big bucks!
Bought both sensors and the socket of of Amazon for less than $100!!
 

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just got done. those clips are a ***** until you finger them out! took about 25 minutes total to do both sides. ScanGauge cleared the P0051 code and i'm gonna take it for a spin.

this site is awesome! i bought both sensors at ROCKAUTO.COM for $99+$17 for 2 day shipping (they arrived next day!) and 25 minutes of my time. VatoZone had Bosch for $89 EACH when i picked up the socket! i wonder what the dealer would charge? nah, not really.....
 

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Just wanted to make sure to thank all of you who have posted "how to's" both on this subject and others. After getting an engine check light I learned my passenger side pre-convertor sensor was shot. Have a 2002 Tundra with 93K miles. Went to Amazon and bought two Denso sensors for $129 including shipping/handling (when I get the guts up enough to do the driver's side, I'll try that, looks way more difficult than the passenger side was).

Funny thing......when I removed the OE sensor, I noticed it was stamped with a Toyota icon, but in small print below it all was the word "DENSO". So I guess Denso made the original sensors for Toyota! I was worried about going with an "after market" one (vs. going to the Toyota dealer where they wanted $183 just for ONE sensor!!!!), but when I saw that printed on the original sensor my worries about that went away.

Anyway, the hardest part for me wasn't detaching the harness connector, that was a bit of a struggle but the harder part is connecting the thing back up with one hand. That took as long as removing the old sensor and installing the new one in the pipe! Like pushing on a rope. What finally worked was just somehow engaging both connectors together, then grabbing your hand around them both and squeezing tight until you hear a click. Then of course test to make sure it's securely connected, as on the first try I thought it was but a little tug and they pulled apart. Make sure it's locked in. Oh, and if the check engine light remains on, run the hand computer again and click the erase button, hold down for 5 seconds and the light will turn off.

Your words and thoughts made the switchout very easy, thank you all very much!!!!!!!!!
 
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